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Posts Tagged ‘palestine’

There can be no I here,
And I can see
There is to be no you,
But soft, that we go together
As friends
To where the dogwood will flower
And the scent of lilac fills the breath of
The disappointed and
The forever tired
With calm. And
We shall bathe in the universe,
Bask in the glories of the sun.
Sweeping aside
Who we were, what we are,
As the day laps on our skin
Gently like a kitten
On a path.
We can’t look behind us.
It is but a sad illusion for those such as us.
We can bring no oil, no wine, no myrrh.
No more of the streets of our youth
No more of the wine vats
In our once luscious gardens.
There is but small growth among them.
Olive trees, dark, like skeletons,
Scorched and barren.
All growth for them is finished but for
The light we afforded their charred roots.
Nothing is there but exile for us.
Let us go.
Let us hasten our renewals.
Now is the time to be kind.
Let us not have this darkness now.
Their suns and moons are no longer ours,
Let us go, as friends should.
Our clouds will flow immaculate over the hills
And leave their traces gently on their souls
With the softness of the freshest cotton,
Lambs wool in the pink morning sun.
Let us go on our way
With nary a backwards glance,
But there, towards our own new present.
Me, the poet
You the eternal traveler.
No longer reticent, but brave in our pace.
Let us go to that place
As friends to the day.

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In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, Muslims, Jews, Christians all lived together in relative peace in Jerusalem, a center of what was then the Ottoman Empire. It was multi- cultural, open minded and peaceful. There was a film made way back in 1913 that reflected the beginning of change. This brilliant documentary is a MUST SEE if you wish to begin to get a larger understanding of what has happened since.

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A very insightful article appeared in the New York Times today, written by Ban Ki-Moon, who is as you should all know, the Secretary General of the United Nations. The article deals with, primarily,  the seeming inability for the state of Israel to accept the inevitability of criticism of their apartheid state as well as the urgency for peace.

Be it Mr. Ki-Moon, or Margot Wallström, the Foreign Minister here in Sweden, in my opinion a superb politician and a person with great sense of decency and convictions, who has taken a terrible beating from both the press and Israel, including Israeli newspaper Makor Rishon when they compared Margot Wallström to Count Folke Bernadotte (including a nod to the Swedish diplomat’s assassination in Jerusalem in 1948), noting “the latent anti-Semitism that characterizes her, her arrogance, ignorance and thinking about her Muslim constituents’ interests.”
(read more: http://www.haaretz.com/opinion/.premium-1.700421  

And yet another Israeli newspaper, in an op-ed has declared that Ms. Wallström “deserves assassination, ( an article can be found here:  http://mondoweiss.net/2016/01/adelson-newspaper-suggests-swedish-foreign-minister-deserves-assassination-for-antisemitic-dna

 

Mr. Ki-Moon goes on to explain the need for immediate serious discussions regarding the two state solution, the need for a unification of thought between and including Gaza and Palestinian Authority, and of course, the immediate need for an end to violence in the areas as a whole. I have very high respect for both Mr. Ki-Moon and Ms. Wallström and urge you to inform yourselves and others regarding the status of Israels refusal to see the truth, and the urgency of the need for a solution. As Mr. Ki-Moon points out, quite correctly, it may be getting to late.

The link to the article is here.. http://nyti.ms/201P0OU

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I never knew death until I saw the bombing of a refugee camp Craters filled with disfigured ankles and splattered torsos But no sign of a face, the only

Source: A Poem for Gaza

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A beautiful poem by a new friend that puts the immigration issue into perspective, Please read!!

 

Source: We Can All Hear The Voices

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I will see nothing
But the children of peace
Their hair spread against the wind
Like the wings of angels

I will hear nothing
From the tombs of your dead
But the voices from my own thoughts
Like the salve of the ages

I will not open my door
To you as a visitor
Bringing your unrepentant anger
To my thirsty soul

I will no longer dance
With you parents of war
Your darkness blots out
The light from my feet

I will not see your world
Nor read your newspaper
Not hear your symphony
I will not say your prayers
But those which I make myself
The words of empowerment
The songs of unison

I will not drink at your table
I will not eat of your meat
You have no nourishment
To offer such a one as I

The end of the world
As you know it
Will be our only salvation

I will not die
Until we, all of us,
Can die under peaceful skies
Our souls drifting quietly across the sunset
Like a shroud of the finest linen

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This is what I hope will be the first of numerous posts about the Nakba, the “Catastrophe” in Arabic, which is generally used to describe the forced removal of thousands of Palestinians from their homeland in 1948. The anniversary, if that is the proper word is generally recognized on May 15, the day after the foundation of the state of Israel, according the Gregorian calendar, being of course, May 14, 1948. But as this very well written history points out, it didn’t begin in 1948, but some 200 years earlier. This is a very sad tale of long term oppression, of brutal imperialist  governments without a care about the people in their rule, but outside their borders. I would ask EVERYONE to read this, to ask questions, to find out what REALLY happened in 1948,, why those who were forced out of their homes and country are STILL not allowed to return. I promise it will anger you, I truly hope it will open your eyes.

http://www.aljazeera.com/programmes/specialseries/2013/05/20135612348774619.html

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