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Posts Tagged ‘Tea Party’

Yesterday was the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women. I want to recognize that, albeit a day late.
In a world where around 70 percent of all women experience physical or sexual abuse during their lifetime, women simply can not allow a step backwards in their march towards freedom and gender equality.They have to refuse it with every fiber of their being.  In the USA, women’s rights are in danger of being slowly replaced by a return to antique, patriarchal repressive denial. It saddens me deeply to think that in the US, those who would eliminate federal funding for childcare or prenatal and post natal care, or loans and grants for higher education for the poor are still being elected to high office, or even worse, almost being elected to the Oval Office.This empowers their continuing denial and inflames their desire for a return to repression. It was the women voters who re-elected  Obama, or rather perhaps, who refused to elect Romney. That should tell you something!
Men around the globe have to learn that their best interests are served by giving women not only true equality, instead of the false version now practised, but true positions of leadership, True empowerment. The ability and opportunity and positions within government to make and enforce policy actions and decisions.
Let us measure up as men. Freedom gained for one is more freedom gained for us all. Take a stand against violence towards women. Not just in the US or here in Sweden but everywhere. Read up on how you can help to stop oppression and gender related violence world-wide. It is happening not just in the third world, not just in extremist muslim countries but right next door to where you live, or perhaps even in your own house. To quote the brilliant Desmond Tutu, “I call on men and boys everywhere to take a stand against the mistreatment of girls and women. It is by standing up for the rights of girls and women that we truly measure up as men.”

This is a brilliant article by Desmond Tutu,, please read it!

http://www.theelders.org/article/let-us-measure-men

Read the message from Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon

http://www.un.org/en/events/endviolenceday/

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An excellent written post about the bigotry of the republicans and tea party.. Pleaase take the time to read it!!

Much of why Congress is experiencing disapproval ratings that are at historic lows is because of the Tea Party and their GOP supporters. Their method of governing is by hostage-taking. Their sense of obligation to those they serve within the corporate world and radical interest groups is seemingly unshakable. In stark contrast, their sense of moral obligation to their constituents  is non-existent. Their basic ideology: science is anti-American, … Read More

via GroundUp

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Today marks the 10th year anniversary of the attacks of September 11, 2001. There are so many others writing about it, I almost didn’t want to, but I feel compelled to write SOMETHING! So here it goes….

I decided that I should examine my own feelings about 9/11 and my own memories of that dreadful day and the days that followed.

I was still in bed, trying to ignore my alarm clock. Actually, it wasn’t my alarm, it was my phone ringing, a rare occurrence, and I of course had to find out who would dare ring me so bloody early or what the earth shattering event was or who had just died. It was, in fact, a friend, sounding very shook up. She asked me if I was watching the news because the U.S. was being attacked. I immediately turned on the news just in time to see the second plane hit. The images of that day, the planes hitting the buildings, the people jumping out from the buildings and then the buildings falling down are burned into my memory forever.

I remember the total shock, the disbelief, and the horror of the moment. What was I watching? How could this happen? Who on earth could do this? I felt like someone had stomped on my stomach, for a moment my mind was totally shut off, I couldn’t think, my emotions were ripped inside out from my depths to my skin and everyone could see them.

I stumbled, quite literally, to the bathroom and began, only on instinct, to get ready for work. How I longed for it to be April fool’s day. How I wished it were just a bad movie I was watching, or a trick, something like Orson Welles performance of War of the Worlds a few decades earlier.

Like a drunk without a memory, I had almost no idea how I made it to work, but I will always remember the feeling that day. The town and in fact the whole world felt like death. This was a death you couldn’t bargain with, couldn’t escape, couldn’t cheat or trick in a game of chess. This was ruthless, cruel and complete in its brutality.

There was an enormous hole in the world and it pulled me and everyone else in the world into it. It ripped my insides out. I couldn’t and wouldn’t believe that anyone could be so cruel, but the evidence was inescapable. I thought of my maternal grandmother who was from Brooklyn, and my many friends who had lived or still do, in New York City, I thought of the families of those who died, of the overwhelming sense of loss.

It seemed that everyone I came into contact with felt a similar grief. I also remember there were so many questions. The ones that journalists are trained to ask, I would suppose, who what when were why etc. but no answers.

Over the next few days, the Bush administration started to “explain” who did it, and started the war of words and propaganda to support its’ position and intentions to invade Afghanistan and then Iraq without support of the international community or the United Nations, setting off a sequence of events that I will, and it hurts me deeply to say this, never forgive my country for. (I will write more on this in another blog, dear reader, so if you’re curious stay tuned.)

Of course I felt tremendous anger about those events. There will never be a place in the civilized world for such brutality, but I also realized that it was a huge protest against much more than the United States. I will always believe that.  It saddened me that so many of my countrymen didn’t see that. I realized that people from all over the world, INCLUDING PEOPLE OF THE MUSLIM FAITH died on that day.

I thought then, and still do, that we need to figure out the true reasons why they felt it necessary to do this and what they felt they could gain. We need to take steps to deny them their power, to change the way we relate to the issues facing the Middle East so that they have no basis for recruitment. The United States needs to ensure that its actions in the Middle East are based solely on humanitarian purposes, without the intention of profit or the furtherance of imperialism.

I can say that I certainly feel I’ve changed from that day, as have so many. My view of the world around me has grown, my awareness of prejudice in America against Muslims has definitely heightened, and that prejudice saddens me deeply, especially when I realize that this anniversary will almost certainly fan those fires again.

When my Swedish friends ask me if I might want to move back to the States, I say, “No, it’s not in my plans”, then I smile and walk away. What I don’t say is that due to the dreadful actions of the Bush administration, the continued illegal holding of people in Guantanamo, the torture of prisoners of war, the rise of such idiots as Sarah Pahlin and the neo religious fascist Tea Party, and most of all the environment of hate and fear that the attacks have brewed in the U.S. I don’t want to live there.  I can’t be a part of that any longer because I no longer believe in the dream.

That is what I lost on that day, 10 years ago. Perhaps I’ll find it again. It would be nice.

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